Portland Oregon Birth Photographer | Announcement

announcement

Only Birth Story Slots available for the 2016 year.

To Book your Birth Story please call 818-636-2903 or email mashagphotog@gmail.com

I only book a maximum of 4 Birth’s per month so please plan and book accordingly. (It is highly recommended that you book your Birth Story as soon as possible to ensure we get you on the calendar)

Thank you everyone for your support!

-Masha Georgiev Photography

Los Angeles Birth Photographer

Portland Birth Photographer | One contraction, at a time….

Los Angeles Birth Photographer

One contraction, at a time…

I came across this article on babycenter.com and wanted to share with all of you. Many feel that epidural is the only way to relieve contraction pain. However many moms who have gone through labor, have commented on these successful natural pain techniques.

In addition to pain medication and epidurals, moms have lots of natural pain-management tricks up their sleeves. We surveyed more than a thousand moms to learn how they eased their labor pain. Here’s what they had to say.

Breathing Exercises

A full three-quarters of BabyCenter moms used breathing exercises to ride out those contractions.

  • I found that blowing out deep breaths really helped me get through the contractions.
  • The contractions were very intense and breathing through the pain was very helpful for me.
  • It felt like I had to take all my energy and focus it, especially during the tough contractions. If I moved or lost focus on my breathing, I felt like I lost control of my body and the pain would take over.

Position changes

Half our moms found that a simple change of position helped relieve the pain. (Exercise balls can be great for this – a quarter of BabyCenter moms used one).

  • Don’t be afraid to move around, walk, sit on a ball, or whatever, it progresses labor faster.
Learn about your options for labor, birth, and after, and make your wishes clear.

Rocking

Many moms rocked their way through contractions.

  • I got through it just one contraction at a time, through breathing, rocking, and moaning.

Walking

If you’re up for it, try a little walk. It helped about one-third of the moms in our survey.

  • I definitely recommend walking to help with labor and delivery

Massage

Don’t underestimate the power of a good massage – be it your back or your feet!

  • I packed a rice heating pad, which was amazing for my back labor.
  • A handheld massager was very useful in early labor when the pain was in my back.
  • My husband rubbed my feet with aromatherapy lotion. I was in heaven.
Learn massage techniques you can use during labor, like “nerve strokes” and the “double hip squeeze”.

Soaking in the tub

Almost one-fifth of BabyCenter moms got some watery relief.

  • I spent the majority of my labor in the bathtub, which helped manage the pain and also relaxed me.

Visualization

Got a nice beach in mind? Go to it during contractions. You can also try visualizing labor before it happens.

  • The biggest advice I have is to envision labor in your mind beforehand. I prepared by telling myself that it’s going to hurt, but it won’t last forever… like a tattoo.
  • Take yourself somewhere else mentally during contractions.
Moms share how they made it through the toughest moments of labor.

Music

If you’re a music lover, try a few tunes for natural pain management, as 14 percent of our moms did. (Looking for some song ideas? Check out our labor playlists).

  • I packed my MP3 player and used it while in labor. The music helped me relax and took my mind off the contractions.

Article credit: http://www.babycenter.com/0_moms-say-top-pain-management-techniques-during-labor_10339940.bc

Masha Georgiev Photography | Portland Oregon Birth Photographer

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Dear Fabulous Blog Readers!

I have another announcement for you.

Sadly, I will not be booking any more photography sessions in California. I will now be working solely in Portland Oregon and surrounding cities.

I am grateful for all the friends I have made here in Los Angeles. Some of you started out as clients, and quickly became more. Many of you have taught me so much. I am grateful to have worked with you, and to know you as a person. I will strive to keep in touch with all of you. You know who you are.

This is a happy announcement. And don’t forget, I do travel. So if you need me in any part of the world, just contact me and we will work something out!

-Masha Georgiev, Birth Photographer

mashagphotog@gmail.com

Los Angeles & Hollywood Photographer | How to do a Styled Fashion Shoot and a DIY Tutu in 1 Hour

As a Los Angeles & Pasadena Birth Photographer, I don’t usually do this type of fashion photography. However, when I get a request like this, I cannot decline it. And I must admit – I HAD A BLAST!

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It was literally a spur the moment thing. I was worried that the 100 degree weather would melt our fun, but this photo shoot only took 1 hour. Here’s how we did it.

  • I went to Joanns Fabric store, bought the elastic band, and 4 spools of this purple tulle. I wanted a longer and more fluffier tutu so I measured the pulled from hip to ankle and used that to cut my tulle. (I actually ran out of tulle, and only had enough to make the front of the tutu! Her back was completely open, but you can’t tell =)
  • MAKEUP – Ani is already very beautiful, she did her own make up and did a great job! If you want a more dramatic look, add more contract and color to the eyes. Thicker eyeliner always looks more dramatic in photos.
  • JEWELRY –  I dug through all my jewelry boxes, and found this Hindi style earrings and necklace set sitting all the way in the back of the drawer. Who knew I had something so beautiful, and just right for this session! The silver bracelet was Ani’s and complimented her outfit.
  • PHOTO SESSION – Usually when shooting outdoors, I have an assistant to help reflect light. This time, I was alone. I tried holding the reflector myself, but the wind kept blowing it away overtime it set it down, so I folded it up, and just tried to pose her in such a way, that I would get good lighting in camera.
  • BACKGROUND – I wanted to do this photo session in an out doors type place, so we went to the closes park around. I wanted Ani to be clear and super sharp in my photos, and I wanted the background to be super creamy bokeh. I used my Canon 50mm f 1.4 Lens and shot at a 2.2 aperture. It was super hot and bright, with lots of tree branch shadows everywhere. We tried to shoot in mostly shady areas, but as you can see we pretty much shot everywhere!
  • POSING – Since I am not a fashion photog, I was a little clueless on what type of poses to do. Pinterest to the rescue! I just searched “Outdoor Fashion Photography Poses” and found tons. Then Ani and I would just look each pose, and try our best to copy it. Here are the results!

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Providence Portland Birth Photographer | Preparing for a Hospital Birth: What All Moms Need to Know

Los Angeles Newborn Photographer

Does your idea of delivery comfort have less to do with the bed you’ll give birth in, and more to do with the medical backup you’ll have on hand? If so, a hospital is probably the most comfortable choice for you — putting you in good company.

Giving birth in a hospital is by far the most popular choice of expectant couples in the United States. It’s the choice for women who have what’s considered a “high-risk” pregnancy (e.g., if you’re 35 and over, are pregnant with multiples or have conditions like gestational diabetes). It also offers the most options in terms of who can make your delivery: While most birthing center and home births are attended by midwives (certified or direct entry), your hospital birth can be overseen by an OB-GYN, a family physician or a certified nurse-midwife (96 percent of CNM deliveries are, in fact, in regular hospitals). Doulas are welcome, too.

Just as there are pros and cons for every choice you’ll make when it comes to your childbirth experience, there are pluses and minuses when it comes to having your baby in a hospital.

ADVANTAGES OF A HOSPITAL BIRTH

Some of the plus-sides of a hospital birth include:

  • It’s the safest option. If you’re at high risk, it’s the safest childbirth environment for you and your baby. Ditto if an unforeseen complication arises during labor (such as a prolapsed cord or placenta abruption, for example).
  • It’s close to an operating room. If you need a cesarean section (either planned or emergency), it’s the only place you can have one. And you won’t have to be transferred mid-labor if it looks like you’ll need one — you’ll just have to move from your birthing room to the operating room.
  • It offers the most advanced technology. On-staff pediatricians and, in many hospitals, sophisticated newborn medical technology are available should your baby need immediate medical care.
  • You have easy access to pain relief. Anesthesiologists on staff are almost always available to provide pain relief medications as you request, from epidurals to narcotics.

DOWNSIDES OF A HOSPITAL BIRTH

Some of the disadvantages of a hospital birth are:

  • Hospitals, especially larger ones, can seem impersonal and intimidating. Taking a tour ahead of time can help you feel more familiar — and more comfortable — at your hospital of choice. Keep in mind, though, that more hospitals, even those big ones, are doing more and more to have a “family-friendly” feel in the labor and delivery wing.
  • Even private rooms aren’t that private. There’s a lot of coming and going in hospital rooms — it may often seem like there’s a round-the-clock revolving door of residents, nurses and other hospital staff members hovering around your bedside. You can expect to get less rest, too, at a hospital for the same reason (“time to check your blood pressure again”).
  • Separations are often routine. Even if you’ve chosen to “room-in” with your baby, there will be times when hospital routines will separate you, including for newborn screenings.
  • Hospital policies rule. Though hospitals are more open to birthing alternatives than ever before (if only to keep up with the demands of expectant parents who’ve come to expect more), they’re bound by protocols and procedures — which means you will be, too. Still, chances are good that with the help of your practitioner you’ll be able to create a birth plan that gives you the birth experience you want, even in a hospital setting.

Without a doubt, hospitals have come a long way since the days when deliveries took place in cold, uncomfortable, sterile delivery rooms. Today, the equipment’s still sterile (and that’s a good thing), but the surroundings are typically far from it. If your hospital has an official policy of family-centered maternity care (many do), you can expect birthing rooms that are comfortable and homey, designed in warm, soothing colors, with all the medical necessities at hand (but hidden behind armoires), dim lights, private bathrooms (including showers and/or baths that can be used for hydrotherapy relief during labor), and ample space — including sofa beds — for family members and your birth coaches (your spouse, a doula etc.).

FINDING THE RIGHT HOSPITAL FOR YOU

It’s never too early to start researching hospitals — especially at some of the more popular facilities, which may have a limited number of spaces in their labor and delivery suites. Check online and ask friends for recommendations. A few things to consider:

  • Is the hospital in your insurance network? Although the Affordable Care Act now requires all insurance plans to cover maternity care, the deductibles, coinsurance, copayments or similar charges for each service can vary, up to an out-of-pocket maximum for in-network providers. If you’re out of network, however, the charges can skyrocket.
  • What amenities does the facility offer? Consider the type of birth you’re hoping to achieve. If you’re hoping for a more natural birth, for example, does the facility offer or allow birthing tubs? If price is less of a factor than convenience, you may also want to consider if the facility offers labor, delivery, recovery and postpartum (LDRP) rooms, where instead of moving between several rooms from labor through recovery you’ll stay put.
  • What’s the C-section rate? Rates of C-sections can vary widely from hospital to hospital, from 7 percent to nearly 70 percent, so it’s a good idea to look into your hospital’s rates online (here is a good source to get started). If your hospital of choice has particularly high rates, you can ask why when you visit the hospital.
  • Does the facility support breastfeeding? If you’re planning to breastfeed, you may want to check if your hospital is a certified “Baby-Friendly Hospital” (see the full list here). The Baby-Friendly certification means the hospital follows World Health Organization and UNICEF guidelines to support mothers in successful breastfeeding, including allowing mothers and infants to room together 24 hours per day. Don’t fret if your hospital isn’t on the list either: Just be sure to ask about breastfeeding assistance your hospital offers when you take your hospital tour.

Finally, take a tour of the facility you’re most interested in using, if possible at around week 30 to 34 of pregnancy. This will give you a chance to ask questions, clear up the smaller details and meet some of the staff who will be assisting you on D-Day.

THE COST OF A HOSPITAL DELIVERY

Your hospital will work with your insurance company to determine what your co-pay will be. While the Affordable Care Act guarantees some low- or no-cost prenatal and infant care, insurance companies vary on the amount charged for your hospital care and stay during labor, delivery and recovery. How much you pay out-of-pocket depends on factors including treatments needed for you and your baby, the facility at which you deliver, your health insurance and more.

Source Material: http://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/hospital-birth/

Photographer: Masha Georgiev Birth Photography

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Portland Oregon Home Birth Photographer | Preparing for a Home Birth

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As a Portland Oregon & Los Angeles Home Birth Photographer I often get asked “Do you think I should have a Hospital or a Home Birth?”

While this is a very personal decision, that should be made between you and your partner, I wanted to jot down how the two differ, and some of the pro’s and con’s for both. So here we go!

In this post I will start with a Home Birth.

What happens during a planned home birth?

During a planned home birth you’ll give birth in your home instead of in a hospital or birth center. You’ll need to be assisted during labor and delivery by a knowledgeable midwife or, in some cases, a doctor to help ensure the health of you and your baby.

During your prenatal care your health care provider will review a list of conditions during pregnancy and labor that would require treatment by a doctor and compromise the safety of a planned home birth. Your health care provider will also review the challenges that can occur during childbirth, how he or she — in comparison with a hospital — would handle them, and the possible health risks for you and your baby.

During labor, your health care provider will periodically — rather than continuously — monitor your temperature, pulse, blood pressure and your baby’s heart rate. After delivery, you’ll be close to your baby. Your health care provider will examine your newborn and determine whether he or she needs to be transferred to a hospital. In addition, your health care provider will give you information on how to care for your newborn. Follow-up care might include home visits and lactation support.

Why do women choose planned home births?

You might choose a planned home birth for many reasons, including:

  • A desire to give birth in a familiar, relaxing environment surrounded by people of your choice
  • A desire to wear your own clothes, take a shower or bath, eat, drink and move around freely during labor
  • A desire to control your labor position or other aspects of the birthing process
  • A desire to give birth without medical intervention, such as pain medication
  • Cultural or religious norms or concerns
  • A history of fast labor
  • Lower cost

Are there situations when a planned home birth isn’t recommended?

A planned home birth isn’t right for everyone. Your health care provider might caution against a planned home birth if you:

  • Have diabetes, chronic hypertension, a seizure disorder or any chronic medical condition
  • Previously had a C-section
  • Develop a pregnancy complication, such as preeclampsia
  • Are pregnant with multiples or your baby doesn’t settle into a position that allows for a headfirst delivery
  • Are less than 37 weeks or more than 41 weeks pregnant

What might cause the need for a hospital transfer?

During a planned home birth, you might need to be transported to a hospital for monitoring or treatment. Your health care provider might recommend transfer to a hospital if:

  • Labor isn’t progressing
  • Traces of fecal waste (meconium) appear in your amniotic fluid
  • The placenta peels away from the inner wall of your uterus before delivery (placental abruption)
  • The umbilical cord drops into your vagina ahead of the baby (umbilical cord prolapse)
  • You have vaginal bleeding not associated with bloody show
  • You don’t deliver the placenta or it’s not delivered intact
  • Your baby shows signs of distress, such as an abnormal heart rate

Your newborn might also need to be transferred to a hospital if he or she has breathing problems or signs of a medical condition.

What are the possible risks of a planned home birth?

While most pregnant women who choose to have planned home births are at lower risk of complications due to careful screening, planned home births are associated with double to triple the risk of infant death than are planned hospital births. Still, even with that increase, the overall risk of infant death is low.

How do I prepare for a home birth?

You can prepare for a planned home birth by:

  • Choosing trained health care providers to assist. It’s important to choose a certified nurse-midwife, a certified midwife or a doctor who has a formal relationship with a health care system overseen by your state health department or The Joint Commission. Make sure he or she has easy access to consultation with doctors or specialists at a collaborating hospital. If you’re interested in additional physical and emotional support, consider hiring a doula — a professional labor assistant. The American Academy of Pediatrics also recommends having present at least one trained person whose primary responsibility is caring for your newborn.
  • Creating a birth plan. Where do you plan to experience labor and delivery? Will you use any specific methods to cope with pain? Do you want a water birth? Will you breast-feed your baby immediately after delivery? What other support people will be present? Discuss the details of your birthing plan with your health care provider. Ask your health care provider what kind of supplies you’ll need to provide, such as towels, sheets or other protective coverings for your floor or mattress.
  • Preparing for a hospital transfer. Discuss with your health care provider the signs and symptoms that might necessitate going to a hospital and how a hospital transfer will affect your birthing plan. Ideally, your home or other planned birth location is within 15 minutes of a hospital with 24-hour maternity care. Make sure you have access to transportation. Ask your health care provider to make arrangements with a nearby hospital to ensure that you can be promptly transferred and treated, if necessary.
  • Choosing a pediatrician. Plan a medical exam for your baby within a few days of birth.
  • Arranging for postpartum help. After delivery, you might need help caring for yourself and your new baby. Arrange for family or friends to help. A doula can also provide postpartum support.

What else do I need to know about a planned home birth?

With careful planning, a home birth can be a positive and rewarding experience. Keep in mind, however, that life-threatening problems can occur during labor and delivery without warning. In those cases, the need to transfer you and your baby to a hospital could delay care, which could put your lives at risk. Understanding the risks and benefits of a home birth can help you make an informed decision about how you plan to give birth.

STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT POST: PREPARING FOR A NATURAL HOSPITAL BIRTH

HAPPY SNAPPIN!

-Masha

Source material: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/labor-and-delivery/in-depth/home-birth/art-20046878?pg=2

Photo: Midwife from the Santa Clarita Valley Birth Center attending a home birth http://scvbirthcenter.com

Photographer: Masha Georgiev Birth Photography

Yosemite CA Photographer | Half Dome and Yosemite Valley

Every year my family and some good friends pack up our stuff, and take along 5 hour drive up to Yosemite California. This is one of those trips that we look forward to all year long. When our trip is over, we are longing to do it again!

Yosemite Valley itself, is a pretty busy place. It’s buzzing with tourists, kids, and wildlife. But for me, it’s a bit too crowded, so my family and I like to stay at the Wawona Campground. Wawona is about a 45 minute drive to Yosemite Valley. Not bad at all considering how beautiful the drive is.

Booking your campsite is another challenge. You only have 1 day out of the whole year to claim your stake and grab your spot! And you better be quick! If you’re not ready to click the “RESERVE”button on the exact hour that it becomes available, chances are you either won’t get a reservation at all, or you will not get the spot that you want. Regardless, camping in Yosemite is still our annual family tradition, and we will be trying to do it every year as long as we can.

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Here are some of the photos from this year’s trip. I was particularly inspired by Ansel Adams. The black and white photos of Half Dome made me want to take a stab at trying to photograph in the same style. Here’s my take at Ansel Adams.

-Masha

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